Just Another Nature Enthusiast

JANE’s Images & Thoughts 🌲 Inspired by the Pacific Northwest & places I wander

  • Look Out!! Yellow Jacket Season

    Look Out!! Yellow Jacket Season

    I am not surprised to learn…Yellow Jackets are at their population peak in the late summer and early fall. This is when nests can have populations of 2,000 to 4,000 worker yellow jackets (all female), some drone (male) yellow jackets and up to 50 queens at once. The workers will soon start dying off until late in autumn when until the nest population is reduced to a small number of…

  • Spotted Bee Balm

    Spotted Bee Balm

    Spotted Bee Balm, a native Eastern Canada and Eastern United States plant, is not the showiest flower around- however, it attracts bees, moths, and hummingbirds, as well as beneficial predatory wasps that can help reduce grubs and pest populations.  We purchased this plant before it bloomed and were surprised by the shape and color of the blooms. It’s been quite interesting to observe. One downside for us though, is that…

  • Motion

    Motion

    Nature, a dynamic force… She strategically uses energy. Changes in position within changes in time- Her creatures have purpose. Caught in translatory motion- insects and birds move along straight and curved lines. In flight, one flower to another, they seek pollen-producing stamens. Blossoms, seemingly immobile- appear to be at rest, await pollination. Motion, a phenomenon in physics- well applied by Nature. Lens Artists Photo Challenge: #212 Motion

  • Robin Tenacity

    Robin Tenacity

    Why do Robins seem to build nests in challenging places? This nest was not shaded during the hottest points in the days of scorching summer heat. It was nerve-wracking to observe. However mom and dad Robin teamed well with feedings and cleanings of the nest. Robin chicks were surprisingly robust in the heat of the day. Whenever we observed from an upstairs window, the group appeared active and ready for…

  • Oh…What a Beautiful Day

    Oh…What a Beautiful Day

    It’s a wonderful feeling… wildlife’s coming our way. After days of record-breaking heat, cooler mornings lured local wildlife out of hiding and into the yard for breakfast. Birds Robins busily gathered worms. We kept a patch watered near the nest in hopes the worms would remain near the surface. Looks like the plan is working! Flickers were eagerly on the lookout for bugs. Hummingbirds hovered for nectar in the salvia…

  • Words to Flutter By

    Words to Flutter By

    Explore… Beware… Discover… Rest when needed… Western Tiger Swallowtail Papilio rutulus Lucas, 1852 Identification: Upperside of hindwing with upper-most marginal spot yellow or lacking. Underside of forewing with separate yellow spots forming marginal band. Hindwing has narrow marginal spots and no orange tint except for 2 spots near end of inner margin. Wing Span: 2 3/4 – 4 inches (7 – 10 cm). Life History: Males patrol canyons or hilltops for receptive females. Females lay…

Curious by nature?